As of the early 21st century, the majority of seafood consumed globally continued to be sourced from wild fisheries even while fish has become humanity's only significant wild food source. Recognizing this, consumers have become increasingly committed to seafood sustainability. In a recent poll, 80 percent of those who regularly eat sustainably caught fish said it is "important" or "very important" that the seafood they buy is caught using sustainable methods (defined as still being plentiful for future generations, and caught using methods that did minimal harm to other animals in the sea).

As pioneering advocates of responsible and well-managed fisheries, this confirms our belief that what we're doing is indeed making a difference. And while we continue to brave the pristine waters of the North Pacific in our quest to bring back decidedly undomesticated fish, we also recognize that even sustainably harvested fish cannot keep up with growing global seafood consumption.

To fill that gap and relieve the pressure on the wild capture fisheries, we are supporting advancements in aquaculture like shellfish culturing that promise healthy seafood alternatives with minimal environmental impact. We look forward to the transition to closed system finfish production from the current standard of open net-pen farming which will eliminate the ecological risk presented by escapement (in which the non-native fish can push the local fish out of their habitat), disease and parasite transfers to the wild stocks, waste build-up and siltation.

In addition to doing our part to contribute to a healthier planet, we're also providing our customers with the finest tasting and most nutritious seafood. As second and third generation fishermen, we know how great fish and shellfish looks and smells and tastes and by hand selecting the seafood that we provide to our customers, we are able to offer an unconditional guarantee of satisfaction. To learn more about these sustainable seafood products, please take a look at the detailed descriptions where you will also find selection and preparation tips generously provided by our friends, the culinary community's top seafood chefs.

Wild Pacific Salmon

To limit the catch to only targeted species (and to avoid the non-targeted bycatch of vulnerable stocks), we troll salmon by hook-and-line (with species-specific lures) and harvest in terminal net fisheries (directing the catch in areas where only the targeted species is present). The five species of wild Pacific salmon – chinook, coho, sockeye, keta and pink – vary in size, colour, texture, and fat content but all share a superb taste, high protein content, and low saturated fat and high polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid content from their diet of the rich ocean nutrients of the North Pacific.
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Wild Pacific Ling

The Pacific ling is one of the least attractive – its Latin name, Ophiodon elongates means long toothed snake – but best tasting fish. Often called ling cod, the Pacific ling is not a cod, but rather a member of the greenling family.
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Wild Pacific Halibut

With a flat body and mottled olive colouring to blend into the ocean floor, the Pacific halibut is the largest of all flatfish growing to a length of eight feet and a weight of 600 pounds. In fact, the Latin name Hippoglossus Stenolepsis translates as 'hippo of the sea".
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Wild Albacore Tuna

A highly migratory fish, wild Pacific albacore tuna are caught by hook-and-line off of the West Coast of British Columbia. Considered an Ocean Wise best choice, wild Pacific albacore tuna populations are healthy and well managed with harvest directed at the younger three to four year class.
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Qualicum Bay Scallops

The cultured Qualicum Bay scallops have emerged as a sustainable alternative to commercially dredged scallops. By raking the ocean floor to sift out scallops, dredging damages the seabed and harvests (and discards) other non-targeted sea life which can include unmarketable, undersized, and endangered species.
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Pacific Oysters

Pacific oyster farming is an environmentally sustainable activity over which the government together with the shellfish farmers and other industry members have developed a set of mandatory operational standards.
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B.C. Spot Prawns

By harvesting with traps rather than nets, our B.C. spot prawn fishery has little impact on the sea bed and sees virtually no unintended and discarded catch, making it one of the best managed and most sustainable of the fisheries. To enable daily harvest of the traps which are set along the B.C.
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Pacific Mussels

Cultured Mediterranean mussels are grown without the use of feeds or chemicals. No new food nutrients are added to the ecosystem, as the Mediterranean mussels simply filter out plankton from the tidal waters that pass through their gill filaments.
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Wild Sablefish

This sleek fish is found in the deep, cold waters of the Pacific ranging from Japan to the Bering Sea and south through Alaska and British Columbia to Mexico. With dark brown to black sides and top and a pale coloured belly, sablefish are commonly called blackcod although they do not belong to the codfish family.
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Pacific Dungeness Crab

Dungeness crab inhabit the sandy seafloor and eelgrass beds along the B.C. coast from the intertidal zone to a depth of 600 feet. With a light reddish brown hard shell, white to light orange underside and white tipped claws, Dungeness crabs can grow to a weight of three pounds and shell width of nine inches.
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Pacific Pink Shrimp

Pacific pink or ocean shrimp are considered the real "shrimps" of the shrimp world with 100 to 160 whole shrimp weighing one pound. By focusing on three main principles – fish stock health, fishery management and the fishery's effect on the ecosystem – our shrimp fishery was the first in the world to earn eco-friendly certification.
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Pacific Humboldt Squid

Growing to more than six feet in length, the Humboldt (or jumbo flying) squid sink to watery depths during the day and, at night, rise to the surface where they use their incredible low-light vision to feed voraciously on a diet of shrimp, hake and other small fish.
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Giant Pacific Octopus

The Giant Pacific Octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) is a cephalopod mollusk that like the other free swimming invertebrates, squid and cuttlefish, lacks a hard shell. The largest of the species, the Giant Pacific Octopus grows to as much as 100 pounds during a three-to-five year life span.
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Pacific Humpback Shrimp

The Humpback (also called King) shrimp (Pandalus hypsinotus) is characterized by a distinctive mottling on its abdomen and derives its name from the arched shape of its carapace. The Humpback occurs in the Bering Sea, from the Aleutian Islands to Puget Sound, and in the Ohkotsk Sea as far south as the Korea Strait.
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Sidestripe or Giant Shrimp

The Sidestripe or Giant shrimp (Pandalopsis dispar) is second in size to the Spot Prawn. Like the other six shrimp species which thrive off the coast of British Columbia, the Sidestripe shrimp exhibits protrandrous hermaphroditism in which it spends its first two years as a male before transforming into a female for the final year of its life.
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Rockfish

Rockfish, a genus of more than 70 different species, have rebounded and are now finding their way on to the menus of the top chefs. Telling the story of the West Coast rockfish is important, because it promises to inspire fishery managers elsewhere to use similar strategies to rebuild other depleted fisheries.
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Gooseneck Barnacles

There are few places in the world where these curious critters are harvested; the west coast of Vancouver Island is one once again, thanks to the revival of a sustainable Nuu-chah-nulth First Nation fishery. A true conversation piece, the sweetly briny stalks (a cross between a lobster and a clam) are best enjoyed simply sautéed on the shell and eaten as a finger food.
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